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About: John Wycliffe Bible (c.1395)


The Holy Bible, containing the Old and New Testaments, with the Apocryphal books, in the earliest English versions made from the Latin Vulgate by John Wycliffe and his followers, c.1395

Source text https:\.wikisource.org(Wycliffe)

John Wycliffe organized the first complete translation of the Bible into Middle English in the 1380s.

The translation from the Vulgate was a collaborative effort, and it is not clear which portions are actually Wycliffe's work.

Church authorities officially condemned the translators of the Bible into vernacular languages and called these heretics Lollards.

Despite their prohibition, revised versions of Wycliffite Bibles remained in use for about 100 years.

Wikisource attributes its source as the Wesley Center Online.

That in turn was derived from the Fedosov transcription on the Slavic Bibles site http://www.sbible.ru

The source text makes no use of archaic letters that were part of Middle English orthography.
The Latin letter Yogh [ȝ] was evidently replaced by the letter [y] in the Fedosov transcription.

The text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License.

Verse numbers were not used in either the earlier or later version of the Wycliffe Bible in the fourteenth century. Each chapter consisted of one unbroken block of text. There were not even any paragraphs. Hence whatever verse numbers we now have in modern editions have been added retrospectively by comparison with other English Bibles and the Latin Vulgate.

Two books found in the Vulgate, II Esdras and Psalm 151, were never part of the Wycliffe Bible.

Module build notes:
1. The Prayer of Manasseh has been separated from 2 Chronicles in order to avoid a critical versification issue.
cf. In Wikisource it was assigned as 2 Paralipomenon chapter 37.
2. The Letter of Jeremiah has been joined to Baruch as chapter 6 thereof.
3. The book order of Wycliffe's Bible differs from that of the Vulg versification used in this module.
4. There are now 313 notes in the Wikisource document.
5. The Wikisource text substantially matches that of the nine books in module version 1.0
6. Each of these five verses not in the Vulg versification was appended to the previous verse: Deut.27.27 Esth.5.15 Ps.38.15 Ps.147.10 Luke.10.43
7. There are also several verses without any text. Use Sword utility emptyvss to list these.